McKinsey is part of the unholy coven – that includes Unum and Atos – of insurance firms and their representatives that seek to advise governments on health policies, and social security policies for those who need benefits because of sickness or disability, without any of their employees ever having taken the hippocratic oath. The “opportunities” outlined in the report and detailed in this article amount to the theft of money from people at the time in their lives when they need it most, and the theft of the founding principle of the NHS – that healthcare should be free for all at the point of use – from an entire nation.
The trouble is, Labour have been, and – as far as I’m aware – remain, as much in the pockets of McKinsey, Unum and Atos as the Tories. “There will never be democracy … when big business can buy both parties and expect a pay-off, whichever one wins.” It’s now a matter of urgency that the Labour leadership must reject these companies, their representatives and their recommendations, and form new policies for healthcare and social security, based on medical evidence and the needs of the patient, rather than the profits of big business.

SKWAWKBOX

A set of restricted-circulation papers prepared by private health consultants McKinsey in 2010 for the NHS in Northern Ireland includes measures that depict a grim future for the NHS’ founding principle of healthcare ‘free at the point of need’. The measures offer a glimpse into the way that government and private consultants see the future of our NHS in Northern Ireland – and, most likely, in the rest of the UK.

The documents are marked

This document is solely for the use of personnel in the Health and Social Care Board and Public Health Agency of Northern Ireland. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the HSCB or PHA without prior written approval.

However, they are stored on a publicly-accessible area of Northern Ireland’s Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS) website, and are therefore in the public domain – perhaps either through…

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